Bored Dogs: How to Recognize Doggy Boredom (and Help!)

Originally, different dog breeds were bred to have different jobs. Even companion breeds were meant to spend all day with their humans. But these days, most dogs get everything they want for free with no work involved.


Plus, they spend hours alone while we go off to work or to run errands. So, do dogs get bored? Absolutely! Doggy boredom can lead to problem behaviors, but more importantly an unhappy dog.


Read on to learn the signs of boredom and tons of tips for making sure your dog is getting all the stimulation he needs.

Doggy Boredom – Signs and Symptoms


A bored dog will make his own fun. And most likely in ways that don’t work for you. When left to their own devices, bored dogs will chew furniture and shoes, shred pillows, or even unroll your toilet paper. Whatever they can find to pass the time. And because you’re not there to stop them, it’s all the more exciting.


Big messes when you get home are a clear sign of a dog with nothing to do. You might also see digging in the backyard or tipping over trash cans. And signs of boredom can be seen even when you’re at home. If your dog is always mugging you for attention and acting restless, chances are he’s bored and wants something to do. He might also jump on you and your guests or bark excessively.


Be sure to rule out separation anxiety if you’re seeing destructive behavior and a clingy attitude. Most of the time, this is simply your dog relieving his boredom and enjoying a lack of supervision. But occasionally it indicates intense distress about being left alone. If you have any concerns, consult a dog trainer or an animal behaviorist.


For further reading click on link: https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/training/bored-dogs-how-to-recognize-doggy-boredom-and-help/ (Article by: Stephanie Gillbault, MSc, CPDT (American Kennel Club)








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